Information Design and Architecture

‘Information Design’ also known as “Information Architecture” (IA) and many other names, but we already knew from Gottlob Frege that a symbol can denote many senses…

The first book on Information Design that I read was this book, published in 2000:
Information Design

edited by Robert Jacobson.

I saw it at the MIT bookstore, and couldn’t resist…

One of the first online journals about usability is Boxes and Arrows, and I had the opportunity to attend a presentation and meet its founder Christina Wodtke…I think she was one of the founders of Information Architecture Institute… the presentation consisted largely of a film featuring interviews with various ‘information architects’…
the opportunity was partly the result of the recent IA Summit which just happened to take place in Montreal… one of the interesting applications
discussed at the summit was Flickr Photo Sharing…

Christina published a book on IA in 2002
Information Architecture: Blueprints for the Web 

Information design and information architecture is interesting to me, although it is a little bit like ‘informatics’, the meaning of this seems to be continually redefined with subtle nuances. the following list of disciplines are closely related:

I suppose the inter-disciplinary nature of information makes it difficult to label…

I just run across this article, and thought it was an interesting parallel between architecture and information architecture… i always thought that these have a lot in common…

We Are All Connected: The Path from Architecture to Information Architecture, by Fu-Tien Chiou

For architectures of large scale websites there is

Information Architecture for the World Wide Web: Designing Large-Scale Web Sites
wirtten by Louis Rosenfeld, Peter Morville. This 2nd edition was published in 2002.

Peter Morville published a new book on IA in 2005:
Ambient Findability

You can read an interview with Peter Morville in Boxes and Arrows by Liz Danzico

Designing Interfaces: Patterns for Effective Interaction Design

by Jenifer Tidwell, the book site (http://designinginterfaces.com/) offers a good summary of the contents. Jenifer Tidwell first presented a UI pattern language.

[Edited from Photomedia Forum post by T.Neugebauer from April 18, 2005 – November 18, 2006]

User-Centered Design

I have been reading about user-centered design for years, and find that the amount of web sites and sources about the subject is overwhelming. There are some key developments in the field that can get buried under all that information, such as the existence of relevant ISO standards:

ISO 13407 – Human-centered design processes for interactive systems (1999)

ISO 9241 (part 11) – Ergonomic requirements for office work with visual display terminals (VDTs) : Guidance on usability (1998)

The Human Factors Research Group (HFRG) at University College Cork (Ireland) has a good introduction to ISO 13407Jurek Kirakowski, director of HFRG also wrote Using ISO 13407 as a guide to personal knowledge and competence.

 


 

 

ISO 9241 (part 11) defines usability as

 

Usability
The effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction with which specified users achieve specified goals in particular environments.Effectiveness
The accuracy and completeness with which specified users can achieve specified goals in particular environments.Efficiency
The resources expended in relation to the accuracy and completeness of goals achieved.Satisfaction
The comfort and acceptability of the work system to its users and other people affected by its use. 

 

see also:
usabilitynet.org – ISO 13407 
usabilitynet.org – International standards for HCI and usability

 

some more interesting articles on usability:

Web-Based User Interface Evaluation with Questionnaires by Gary Perlman

Usability measurement in context (PDF) by
Nigel Bevan and Miles Macleod (Behaviour and Information Technology, 13, 132-145 (1994), National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex, UK) In this study, the profile of perceived usability was subdivided into 5 subscales: Affect, Efficiency, Helpfulness, Control, and Learnability.

 

From a user’s perspective, the time he or she spends carrying out the task, or the effort
required to complete the task are the resources he or she consumes. These two types of
resources produce two different definitions of efficiency:Temporal Efficiency = Task Time = Effectiveness
Human Efficiency = Effort (e.g.: cognitive workload) = EffectivenessFrom the point of view of the organisation employing the user, the resource consumed is
the cost to the organisation of the user carrying out the task, for instance:¥ The labour costs of the user’s time
¥ The cost of the resources and the equipment used
¥ The cost of any training required by the user

In this case, efficiency can be stated as:
Economic Efficiency = Effectiveness

[…]

Measures of satisfaction describe the perceived usability of the overall system by its
users and the acceptability to the system to the people who use it and to other people
affected by its use. Measures of satisfaction may relate to specific aspects of the system
or may be measures of satisfaction with the overall system.

 

see also:
usability.gov – official U.S. Government Web site managed by the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services

Current practice in measuring usability: Challenges to usability studies and research by Kasper Hornbæk
International Journal of Human-Computer Studies
Volume 64, Issue 2, February 2006, Pages 79-102
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijhcs.2005.06.002
open access version: http://www.cs.chalmers.se/idc/ituniv/kurser/09/hcd/literatures/Hornbaek%202006%20usability%20measurement%20methods.pdf

[Edited from Photomedia Forum post by T.Neugebauer from Sep 22, 2006 ]