Harvard’s Digital Photography Course Online

Harvard University has uploaded their digital photography course online:

DGMD E-10: Exposing Digital PhotographyFall 2015
Instructor: Dan Armendariz
Teaching Fellows: Shelley Westover, Rob McCarthy, Jordan Hayashi, Henry Vega Ortiz
Producer: Jordan Hayashi
Harvard Extension School

http://digitalphotography.exposed/

The courses include video lectures on optics, light, exposure, digital cameras and software, histograms, colour, artifacts.

[Photomedia Forum post by T.Neugebauer from Jan 14, 2017  ]

Marc Levoy’s digital photography course lectures

A Stanford University Digital Photography course taught Marc Levoy is now openly available, including the video of 18 lectures of the course:

https://sites.google.com/site/marclevoylectures/

An introduction to the scientific, artistic, and computing aspects of digital photography. Topics include lenses and optics, light and sensors, optical effects in nature, perspective and depth of field, sampling and noise, the camera as a computing platform, image processing and editing, and computational photography. We will also survey the history of photography, look at the work of famous photographers, and talk about composing strong photographs.

[Photomedia Forum post by T.Neugebauer from Sep 05, 2016   ]

An interview with photo-book designer Teun van der Heijden

http://www.vogue.it/en/people-are-talking-about/focus-on/2013/05/teun-van-der-heijden


Teun started his career as graphic designer and it was his collaboration with the World Press Photo (for which he curates all graphic aspects, including the annual catalogue) that led him to develop an interest in photography, so much so as to want to study it, to fall in love with it and become the most in-demand name among photographers when it comes to design their books.Teun has profusely worked with some of the internationally most esteemed photographers and his books have won numerous awards including the POYi (Picture of the Year international).
 

[Photomedia Forum post by T.Neugebauer from Apr 03, 2016   ]

Mimmo Jodice

The 29th Festival of Films on Art in Montreal also featured a film by Giampiero D’Angeli and Alice Maxia about the Italian photographer Mimmo Jodice. The film opens with Mimmo Jodice strolling the Mediterranean coast during a beautiful morning light, he speaks about the infinity of the sea while the audience is treated to his photographs of the sea.

The film is an inspiring conversation with the photographer. Jodice describes his journey into photography from the beginning, which was for him in the late 1950s. The next decade was particularly inspiring for him as he had the opportunity to meet artists such as Lucio Amelio, Warhol, Rauschemberg, Beuys, Kounellis, Burri, Pistoletto. He became a teacher of photography at the Naples Academy during a time when such posts were quite unusual for photography. Mimmo Jodice’s photography includes experimental works that explore the relationship of photography to reality and memory. He has continued to photograph the urban environment of Naples, its inhabitants, architecture and sculpture.

The film follows the photographer from the studio to the streets of Naples as he takes photographs with his medium-format film camera. I particularly enjoyed the sequences in the darkroom, where we get a rare glimpse into his darkroom techniques. The film is part of a series titled “Fotografia Italiana”, available on DVD from giart.tv. The other four documentaries in the series are dedicated to: Gabrielle Basilico, Gianni Berengo Gardin, Franco Fontana, and Ferdinando Scianna.

Mimmo Jodice quotes the Portuguese poet Fernando Pessoa:

…but what was I thinking about before I got lost in seeing? This phrase seems as though it were written for me and describes my recurring behaviour quite well: I lost myself in seeing, imagining, and following visions outside reality

[Photomedia Forum post by T.Neugebauer from Apr 05, 2011 ]

Resource Magazine and RETV

Resource Magazine is a quarterly magazine “dedicated to the sub-culture of the photo production industry”. It is distributed as a magazine in studios, photo labs, prop and rental house locations. The authors also maintain a blog.

RETV features video content from corresponding Resource Magazine articles, interviews with photographers, product demos, how-tos and documentaries. There are over a hundred videos available already, everything from a tutorial on how to create images of bubbles,interview with an advertising agency Indika.

[Photomedia Forum post by T.Neugebauer from Apr 23, 2012   ]

Gabor Szilasi – The Eloquence of the Everyday, at McCord Museum in Montreal until February 6, 2011

Gabor Szilasi (b. Budapest, 1928) has created, over the course of the last 50 years, one of Canada’s most significant and influential bodies of photographic work, by documenting a society that is in constant flux.

The exhibition Gabor Szilasi – The Eloquence of the Everyday is comprised of portraits, domestic and commercial interiors, urban views of Montreal and Budapest, and images of rural Quebec, all contributing to the creation of an intricate social and historical record.

At the end of January, I attended a discussion featuring Szilasi,

 Conversation between photographers
Gabor Szilasi discusses photography with artists and friends in the field.


Gabor Szilasi at McCord Museum, January 27th ,2011 

[Photomedia Forum post by T.Neugebauer from Dec 20, 2010  ]

Elliott Erwitt at Maison Européenne de la Photographie


Elliott Erwitt at the Maison Européenne de la Photographie

I had the pleasure to attend the vernissage last week of Elliott Erwitt’s exhibition “Personal Best”. The exhibition at the Maison Européenne de la Photographie includes a comprehensive collection of his work, also published

in the book     

This wonderful exhibition started on February 3rd and continues until 4th of April, 2010.

 

Avec plus de cent trente œuvres, dont de nombreux tirages d’époque très peu vus, l’exposition retrace l’ensemble du parcours d’Elliott Erwitt depuis soixante ans, à travers une sélection de ses images préférées. Photographe depuis 1948, membre de l’agence Magnum Photos depuis 1953, il est un observateur vif et espiègle de la vie quotidienne ; on trouve parmi ses sujets de prédilection les enfants, les chiens, la plage, la politique et les célébrités. Témoin des grands événements du 20e siècle, ce maître de l’instant est aussi un infatigable homme d’esprit, un humoriste subtil et poétique dont le travail mêle satire et mélancolie. Elliott Erwitt a également réalisé des films documentaires, consultables, pour certains, à la vidéothèque de la MEP.

L’exposition est réalisée en collaboration avec Magnum Photos et le Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia. 

 

Elliott Erwitt’s web site: http://www.elliotterwitt.com/

[Photomedia Forum post by T.Neugebauer from Feb 05, 2010  ]

PhotoTechEDU online lecture series on digital photography

Google Tech Talk has a series of videos on digital photography in the series “PhotoTechEDU”.

PhotoTechEDU Day 1: Photo Technology Overview

PhotoTechEDU Day 2: Photo Technology Overview Continued

PhotoTechEDU Day 3: Ray Tracing, Lenses, and Mirrors

PhotoTechEDU Day 4: Contrast, MTF, Flare, and Noise

PhotoTechEDU Day 5: Silicon Image Sensors

PhotoTechEDU Day 6: Digital Camera Image Processing…

PhotoTechEDU Day 7: Lossy Image Compression

PhotoTechEDU Day 8: Diffraction and Interference in Imaging

PhotoTechEDU Day 9: Amateur Astrophotography

PhotoTechEDU Day 10: Image Compression Part 2

PhotoTechEDU Day 11: Document Image Analysis with Leptonica

PhotoTechEDU Day 12: High Dynamic Range Image Capture

PhotoTechEDU Day 14: Exposing Digital Forgeries from…

PhotoTechEDU Day 16: Multi-viewpoint Mosaics

PhotoTechEDU Day 18: Non-destructive, Selective, Editing…

PhotoTechEDU Day 19: Inkjet printing…

PhotoTechEDU Day 22: Measuring, Interpreting and…

PhotoTechEDU Day23: Raw Files and Formats

PhotoTechEDU Day 25: Open-source-based high-resolution…

PhotoTechEDU Day 26: Image quality testing and…

PhotoTechEDU Day27: Focus on Resolution

PhotoTechEDU Day 28: “Capturing more Light”: Pragmatic…

PhotoTechEDU Day 29: Photographing VR Panoramas

PhotoTechEDU Day 30: Imaging optics for the next decade

PhotoTechEDU Day 31 – Color Balance: Babies, Rugs & Sunsets

[Photomedia Forum post by T.Neugebauer from Jan 27, 2009 ]

Philosophy of Photography by Henri Van Lier

Philosophy of Photography by Henri Van Lier is a recently published attempt at inducing theory from photography.

A philosophy of photography could be taken to mean the act of philosophizing on the subject of photography. That is to say, one can examine photography on the basis of concepts philosophers have accumulated over a period of two and a half millenia. One could inquire into its links with perception, imagination, nature, substance, essence, freedom and consciousness. […]

But the philosophy of the photograph can also designate the philosophy emanating from the photograph itself, the kind of philosophy the photo suggests and diffuses by virtue of its characteristics. 

Henri Van Lier’s book includes a broad range of insights into photography, its physical and social implications.

After having scrutinized all of its characteristics, it might be said that photography is best understood in light of the opposition often made today between the real and reality. Reality designates the real in so far as it is already seized and organized in sign systems, thus assuming the form of the actions, which are the designates that dominate or represent the signs in question. By contrast, the real is that which escapes this conception of reality. It is all that is before, after and underneath reality, it is all that is not yet domesticated by our technical, scientific, and social relations, and which Sartre, for instance, dubbed the quasi-relations of the in-itself. (p36). 

From the chapter “The Initiative of the Spectacle: Photogenicity”,

Even in a conventional photograph, often something will appear that neither the photographer nor the photogaphed actively looked for or even sensed in advance. A particular area of a face, a statement in someone’s shoulder or ankle, creases in clothes preceding any possible intention, not to be recovered by any notion of intentionality […]
This etymologically defines photogenicity as the manner in which one is generated by light. (It is the word Talbot chose before Herschel proposed “photography”) (p.63)

The introduction, written by Jan Baetens & Geert Goiris, refers to another work on this theme, Towards a Philosophy of Photography by Vilem Flusser. The editors praise Van Lier’s book as a comparable theoretical achievement to Susan Sontag and Roland Barthes, Walter Benjamin and André Malreaux, André Bazin and John Berger. Interestingly, that opening introductory section “What we can learn from Henri Van Lier” begins with the following statement about the Internet,

In our times of globalization, real-time communication, and increasing exchanges or mergers between cultures and traditions, it would be an illusion to think that all texts and ideas exist simultaneously and can be accessed freely in the universal library of Babel, aka Google.

[Photomedia Forum post by T.Neugebauer from  Dec 02, 2008]